By Jove!

Jupiter Lunar Landing

From one of Jupiter’s 12 moons, earth astronauts gaze on this impressive, but bleak, view of the 86,900 mile-diameter planet. More than 316 times the mass of the Earth, Jupiter is seven times further from the sun than Earth; would require voyage of one to two months to reach at velocity of one million feet per second. Max Hunter, Douglas Aircraft Company engineer predicts economically feasible trips to Jupiter will be made through development of nuclear thrust spaceship engines. 

Douglas Aircraft Company, Inc. General Offices, Santa Monica, Calif.

Image credit: Douglas Aircraft Company

Image source: Numbers Station

Inside Deimos

ROMBUS

Configuration for a manned Mars mission (Project Deimos).

  1. Six man Mars landing capsule;
  2. Pressurized tunnel;
  3. Toroidal living compartment;
  4. Liquid hydrogen tanks (8);
  5. Spherical liquid oxygen tank
  6. Booster centerbody.

Project Deimos – Mars Landing Module

  1. Earth-return capsule;
  2. Command centre and pressurized tunnel;
  3. Separation joint, for return to Mars orbit;
  4. Mars landing propellant tanks(6);
  5. Ground access hatch;
  6. Mars-launch platform;
  7. Payload and power supply equipment compartment;
  8. Mars-launch propellant tank;
  9. Landing and take-off rocket motor;
  10. Jettisonable closure panel;
  11. Mars-entry heat shield;
  12. Extensible landing gear(4);
  13. Altitude-control system quads (4).

Text from Frontiers of Space by Philip Bono & Kenneth Gatland, 1969

Project Deimos at Astronautix

Philip Bono at Astronautix

Image credit: Douglas

Image source: Numbers Station

Deimos Storyboard

Mission to Mars (Project Deimos)

  1. Hydrogen tanks jettison as ROMBUS spaceship accelerates from Earth-orbit;
  2. Two hydrogen tanks jettison after retro-thrust into Mars orbit. Mars Landing Module separates from ROMBUS parent above the cratered deserts;
  3. After soft-landing, astronauts begin exploration setting out research equipment and taking meteorological soundings;
  4. Ascent stage of Mars Landing Module returns astronauts to ROMBUS parent in Martian orbit for return to Earth.

Text from Frontiers of Space by Philip Bono & Kenneth Gatland, 1969

Project Deimos at Astronautix

Philip Bono at Astronautix

Image credit: Douglas

Image source: SDASM Archives

Mars Operational Phase

It’s January 1972.

Having safely glided to a stop on a Martian plateau, this illustration depicts the Operational Phase of the mission. The crew have already inflated their six meter habitat (it’s a tent), assembled the flat-pack steamroller and are shown removing the nuclear reactor so it can be dragged at least a kilometer from base camp so it won’t kill them.

With the reactor at a safe distance, the crew of eight have 479 days to explore the surface of Mars and maybe do a spot of gardening.

You can read more about this fascinating 1960 Boeing Study here.

Boeing Mars Glider at Astronautix

Philip Bono at Astronautix

Image credit: Boeing / Chicago Daily News

Image source: Numbers Station

STCAEM MEV

STCAEM MEV at Astronautix

Image credit: Boeing

Image source: NASA MSFC

Don Charles

Project Deimos at Astronautix

Philip Bono at Astronautix

Image credit: Douglas

Image source: SDASM Archives