NAR Space Division

I’m pretty certain these two images are by the same hand, but which one? They’re both heavily referenced and painted in what I would describe as North American Rockwell’s house style, but the palette and brushwork bring me back to a beautiful painting Don Bester did of the Saturn Shuttle. I could be wrong, but that’s the box I’m checking for now.

Shuttle Program at Astronautix

Image credit: North American Rockwell

Image source: Mike Acs

Saturn Shuttle

Shuttle Program at Astronautix

Image credit: North American Rockwell

Image source: Numbers Station

Shuttle by Donald Bester

Shuttle Program at Astronautix

Image credit: North American Rockwell

Image source: Numbers Station

Nova (Waterlaunch)

Nova at Astronautix

Image credit: Convair

Image source: SDASM Archives

S-72-464-S

Shuttle Program at Astronautix

Image credit: NASA

Image source: SDASM Archives

Booster Separation

Exploring Tomorrow in Space
Thomas Becker
Sterling, 1972

Shuttle Program at Astronautix

Image credit: Grumman

Image source: Numbers Station

Vehicle Comparison

Apollo Program at Astronautix

Image credit: NASA

Image source: NASA Johnson

The Apollo Family Tree

Apollo Program at Astronautix

Image credit: NASA

Image source: NASA Johnson

Titan III C

The huge Titan III C vehicle, towering over 150 feet into the air, movies into place on the launch pad. Missile is carried on same railroad car on which its parts were assembled.

Once the solid rockets have lifted Titan III C and it’s payload off the ground, their role is finished. As this sketch shows, when the solids burn out, they separate from the core section. Just before solid burnout, the first-stage liquid propellant engines are ignited to push the spacecraft farther towards space.

Course of the Titan III and it’s payload is monitored from a launch center such as this.

Orbiting Stations: Stopovers to Space Travel
Irwin Stambler
G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1965

Titan at Astronautix

Image credit: USAF

Image source: National Archives

TITAN

Artist’s concept of the Titan standard launch vehicle 34-D entering the space.

An artist’s concept of the new modular three-section fairing for the Air Force’s Titan III-C space launch vehicle.

Titan at Astronautix

Image credit: USAF

Image source: National Archives

All-Purpose Space Vehicle

  1. All-purpose space vehicle proposed by Douglas Missile & Space Systems Division engineer Phil Bono, is pictured in artist’s concept during refueling in earth orbit prior to flight to the moon.
  2. Refueling tankers, on either side will return to earth. Vehicle carries up to eight “strap-on” liquid hydrogen tanks, which can be ejected after they are emptied or retained for use on moon. Retro engines are fire as spacecraft nears lunar surface to allow a direct landing without an orbital maneuver. All-purpose space vehicle proposed by Douglas Missile & Space Systems Division engineer Phil Bono, is pictured in artist’s concept during refueling in earth orbit prior to flight to the moon.
  3. Empty strap-on tanks are lowered to lunar surface before each return flight.
  4. These liquid hydrogen tanks could be used as shelter for pioneering lunar colony.

Space World

December 1964, VOL. A-14

Project Selena at Astronautix

Image credit: Douglas

Image source: Numbers Station

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